J.B.Cramer :: Etudes (1~4) played from Beethoven’s copy :: Wim Winters, clavichord

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J.B.Cramer :: Etudes (1~4) played from Beethoven’s copy :: Wim Winters, clavichord 2017-03-28T01:31:05+00:00

J.B.Cramer :: Etudes (1~4) played from Beethoven's copy

And then this strange thing happened.
No, not that I play these etudes on clavichord, that shouldn't be too strange to you, no, it has something to do with that visit of Clementi. Which was fake (in case you wouldn't have guessed that by yourself). First I'll give you the index of this video:

0:10 Etude 1 in C Major
1:16 Etude 2 in E Minor
2:16 Etude 3 in D Major
3:44 Etude 4 in C Minor

In case you are interested to know more about this music and the clavichord, there will be -as always- an Afterthought edition within two days. To be short: I think it does, and playing from a score Beethoven owned, puts this "English" music from Mr Cramer, who was born in Mannheim, again in a German-Viennese tradition.
Having said this: you can "feel" the keys of the English square piano while playing some passages, how should that surprise. But... I would advice every clavichord player to study this music, these etudes on clavichord. They aren't easy to play on that instrument that we all love, but I'm sure you will improve your touch, technique and approach to the instrument. One has to be really in perfect "touch" with his instrument to play this music. No wonder actually that Beethoven's students played much of this music. And even much later, at the time where Clara Schumann went to England on tour, she writes in her diaries that there is no better way to start the day than with Cramer, for the first reason that his etudes bring the player in close contact with his/her instrument. And they do!

But now the strange thing that happened.
You might have read the story of Clementi's visit at my place. If not, here is the link.

Clementi was complaining about the fact that only Beethoven could operate the telephone and that the master would refuse to share his knowlegde on this. So Beethoven could call (which he did, as you might have read earlier), and Clementi could not. That is the reason that he had to come by horse and thereby had to time shift my house and the complete environment to early 19th century. Only for a short period, but anyway, Beethoven had a clear advantage.

Again, of course... all this didn't happen...

But here is the thing:
The Clementi sonata was already uploaded for some days. Only the text needed to be written, which I usually do last minute. So the 19th September, at about 10PM, I wrote that Clementi story. Afterwards shut down the computer and went to bed.

At about 11PM, when the lights were off for about ten minutes -I always read something before I close my eyes at night- the telephone rang.
Anja reached for the telephone and the display indicated:
"External call".
It rang 3 or 4 times and then stopped.
We have those telephones now for about 5 years, and that is the first time this message appears. It is either the number of the one who is calling, or "Anonymous", or: call from down-stares, but never "External call".

Not saying that it was Beethoven.

But after having written that silly story about Clementi... it did fell strange.
Mixing fantasy with real life: one should take care to keep a clear sight, it is not always that obvious...!

Hope you enjoy these Cramer pieces, I'll do more of them.

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